Media relations 101 tells us that you need to tailor your pitch for the publication and specific journalist, and this is especially true for news from AI businesses because the range of knowledge in the different audiences that journalists write for is vast. At one end of the spectrum, we have mainstream tabloid that seem to want to write about robots taking our jobs and Skynet prophecies. At the other end, there are publications with specific AI and ML sections who’ll be interested in the latest generative adversarial network system.

Media relations 101 tells us that you need to tailor your pitch for the publication and specific journalist, and this is especially true for news from AI businesses because the range of knowledge between the journalists – not to mention the different audiences they write for – is vast.

At one end of the spectrum, we have mainstream tabloid that seem to want to write about robots taking our jobs and Skynet prophecies. At the other end, there are publications with specific AI and ML sections which are interested in the latest generative adversarial network system.

We use a three step process for each story we’re pitching:

1. Who is your audience for this story?

2. Which are the most appropriate publications to reach that audience?

3. How do we get your story in those publications?

Before we ever have a conversation with a journalist we will take the time to get to know you first. We take the time to get to know your product and technology inside out, so when we do have a conversation with a journalist, we have as many answers as possible to their questions and maximise our chances.

When we get to the pitch itself, we’ll first do our research on the journalist we’re about to speak to. If we don’t know them already then we’ll look at their Twitter feed and recent articles they have written. Then we will usually call them to speak to them directly about the story – a direct conversation always has the most chance of resulting in coverage – and even if it doesn’t result in something straight away, it sets you up for a future conversation based on their feedback.

With AI stories in particular, we often find there’s two parts to a story that we’re pitching, we’re rarely pitching the final product because it seems the job is never finished when it comes to AI and ML – there’s always something new and exciting around the corner. So we find ourselves pitching the vision as well as the reality – and this is a careful balancing act.

What you need to separate is what’s newsworthy – the reason why the journalist needs to write their story today – and what’s big-picture-fascinating that gets the reader to click on an article.

Talk to us about getting your AI story in the media, and how you can best reach your target audience.